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IES Research Symposium II: Light+Behavior has ended

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Gold Room [clear filter]
Monday, April 7
 

8:00am PDT

Welcome and Opening Remarks
Welcome to the IES Light + Behavior Symposium.  Remarks from Committee Chair, Kevin Flynn and Committee Member, Pam Horner. Gold Room - 3rd Floor

Speakers
avatar for Kevin J. Flynn

Kevin J. Flynn

Kiku Obata & Company
Kevin Flynn, Kiku Obata & Company
avatar for Pam Horner

Pam Horner

Pamela Horner


Monday April 7, 2014 8:00am - 8:15am PDT
Gold Room

8:15am PDT

Case Study #1: Education - The Design Perspective

This three-part session will explore and debate design assumptions and associated research findings specific to light’s effect on human behavior in educational facilities. Three highly qualified experts from the realms of lighting design and research will present their views on Connectedness (people with one another and their environments) and Comfort , including fresh perspectives on daylighting, glare, light patterns, “photic history,”  and lighting control techniques. The desired outcomes of the speaker/audience interactions are 1) to highlight any direct connections between known research and lighting practice as they relate to human behavior in educational facilities, and 2) to identify key areas of research that could significantly inform and improve future design.


Speakers
avatar for Charles Thompson

Charles Thompson

Archillume Lighting Design Inc
Charles Thomson, President, Archillume Lighting Design, Inc.


Monday April 7, 2014 8:15am - 9:15am PDT
Gold Room

9:25am PDT

Education Research Response #1: Visual

This three-part session will explore and debate design assumptions and associated research findings specific to light’s effect on human behavior in educational facilities. Three highly qualified experts from
the realms of lighting design and research will present their views on Connectedness (people with one another and their environments) and Comfort , including fresh perspectives on daylighting, glare, light patterns, “photic history,”  and lighting control techniques. The desired outcomes of the speaker/audience interactions are 1) to highlight any direct connections between known research and lighting practice
as they relate to human behavior in educational facilities, and 2) to identify key areas of research that could significantly inform and improve future design.


Speakers
avatar for Arnold Wilkins

Arnold Wilkins

University of Essex
Arnold Wilkine, Department of Psychology - University of Essex


Monday April 7, 2014 9:25am - 10:10am PDT
Gold Room

10:20am PDT

Education Research Response #2: Non-Visual

This three-part session will explore and debate design assumptions and associated research findings specific to light’s effect on human behavior in educational facilities. Three highly qualified experts from
the realms of lighting design and research will present their views on Connectedness (people with one another and their environments) and Comfort , including fresh perspectives on daylighting, glare, light patterns, “photic history,”  and lighting control techniques. The desired outcomes of the speaker/audience interactions are 1) to highlight any direct connections between known research and lighting practice
as they relate to human behavior in educational facilities, and 2) to identify key areas of research that could significantly inform and improve future design.


Speakers
avatar for Mariana Figueiro

Mariana Figueiro

Lighting Research Center - RPI
Mariana Figueiro, PhD , Program Director, Associate Professor , Lighting Research Center - Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute


Monday April 7, 2014 10:20am - 11:05am PDT
Gold Room

11:10am PDT

Speaker Q+A for Education Sessions
Audience Q+A with the speakers from the morning Case Study I Education Sessions

Speakers: Charles Thompson, Arnold Wilkins and Mariana Figueiro.   
Gold Room - Third Floor      

Monday April 7, 2014 11:10am - 11:30am PDT
Gold Room

2:00pm PDT

Afternoon Welcome | Introductions
Randy Burkett will introduce the afternoon sessions on Urban Environments

Speakers
avatar for Randy Burkett

Randy Burkett

Randy Burkett Lighting Design
Randy Burkett, President, Randy Burkett Lighting Design


Monday April 7, 2014 2:00pm - 2:05pm PDT
Gold Room

2:05pm PDT

Case Study #2: Urban Environments - The Design Perspective

This session will examine what role lighting design can play in influencing human behavior in the nighttime outdoor environment. The presenters will illustrate design practice techniques used to exploit light's ability to reinforce, enhance, modify and manipulate behavioral response.  They will offer up case study precedent work as well as established lighting design methodologies for such approaches. The goal will be to provide the designer's perspective on how these frequently applied methods can result in the apparent strengthening of desired behaviors. 

Previous and ongoing research precedents will be cited to help explain why the design approaches empoyed in the real life application examples are, by many measures, successful.  In certain cases, there may not be science to support such conjecture - or even some research that contradicts the practice - but why it might or might not still be an effective design methodology will be examined.

Both designers and researchers will offer a position on where future research can be focused that would be supportive of lighting practioners in the application area discussed.


Speakers
avatar for Randy Burkett

Randy Burkett

Randy Burkett Lighting Design
Randy Burkett, President, Randy Burkett Lighting Design
avatar for Nancy Clanton

Nancy Clanton

Clanton & Associates
Nancy Clanton, President, Clanton & Associates



Monday April 7, 2014 2:05pm - 3:05pm PDT
Gold Room

3:15pm PDT

Urban Environments Research Response #1: Visual

This session will examine what role lighting design can play in influencing human behavior in the nighttime outdoor environment. The presenters will illustrate design practice techniques used to exploit light's ability to reinforce, enhance, modify and manipulate behavioral response.  They will offer up case study precedent work as well as established lighting design methodologies for such approaches. The goal will be to provide the designer's perspective on how these frequently applied methods can result in the apparent strengthening of desired behaviors. 

Previous and ongoing research precedents will be cited to help explain why the design approaches empoyed in the real life application examples are, by many measures, successful.  In certain cases, there may not be science to support such conjecture - or even some research that contradicts the practice - but why it might or might not still be an effective design methodology will be examined.

Both designers and researchers will offer a position on where future research can be focused that would be supportive of lighting practioners in the application area discussed.


Speakers
avatar for Steve Fotios

Steve Fotios

University of Shefield
Steve Fotios, Professor of Lighting and Visual Perception, University of Shefield


Monday April 7, 2014 3:15pm - 4:00pm PDT
Gold Room

4:10pm PDT

Urban Environments Research Response #2: Non-Visual

This session will examine what role lighting design can play in influencing human behavior in the
nighttime outdoor environment. The presenters will illustrate design practice techniques used to
exploit light's ability to reinforce, enhance, modify and manipulate behavioral response.  They will offer up case study precedent work as well as established lighting design methodologies for such approaches. The goal will be to provide the designer's perspective on how these frequently applied methods can result in the apparent strengthening of desired behaviors. 

Previous and ongoing research precedents will be cited to help explain why the design approaches
employed in the real life application examples are, by many measures, successful.  In certain cases, there may not be science to support such conjecture - or even some research that contradicts the practice - but why it might or might not still be an effective design methodology will be examined.

Both designers and researchers will offer a position on where future research can be focused that
would be supportive of lighting practioners in the application area discussed.


Speakers
avatar for Jack Nasar

Jack Nasar

Ohio State University
Jack Nasar, Professor, Austin E. Knowlton School of Architecture, Ohio State University


Monday April 7, 2014 4:10pm - 4:55pm PDT
Gold Room

5:00pm PDT

Speaker Q+A for Urban Environments Sessions
Q+A Session with speakers from the Urban Enviornment Sessions.
Speakers: Randy Burkett, Nancy Clanton, Steve Fotios and Jack Nasser.

Gold Room - 3rd Floor - Renaissance Cleveland Hotel.   

Monday April 7, 2014 5:00pm - 5:30pm PDT
Gold Room
 
Tuesday, April 8
 

8:00am PDT

Welcome Remarks

Closing day remarks from Symposium Steering Chair, Kevin Flynn. 

Morning session introductions by Rita Harrold, IES Director of Technology  


Speakers
avatar for Kevin J. Flynn

Kevin J. Flynn

Kiku Obata & Company
Kevin Flynn, Kiku Obata & Company
avatar for Rita Harrold

Rita Harrold

Illuminating Engineering Society
Rita Harrold, Director of Technology, Illuminating Engineering Society


Tuesday April 8, 2014 8:00am - 8:15am PDT
Gold Room

8:15am PDT

Case Study #3: Healthcare Facilities - The Design Perspective

The session will focus on the socio-cultural aspects of light that must be accounted for with respect to quality of light, both visual and non-visual, to satisfy the needs of patients and caregivers. 

Complexities of healthcare facilities include the challenge of designing for a variety of space types (newborn to geriatric; patient rooms to operating theaters; visitors’ lounges to nursing stations), casual to critical seeing tasks, satisfying concerns for safety and successful patient outcomes, all with “patient first” as the mandate. 

Traditionally, the effects of light, its sensory qualities, have not been acknowledged as much as the familiar measurable quantities such as illuminance, luminance, and watts per square foot.  How do we identify and define quality lighting for the specific benefit of patient wellbeing?  Does lighting play a role in improving patient response?  Do patients enjoy a beneficial response to daylighting?

Collaboration between design professionals and behavioral scientists is critical to our understanding of how to use light to gain potential health benefits in patient care facilities.


Speakers
avatar for John D’Angelo

John D’Angelo

New York Presbyterian Hospital
John D’Angelo, Vice President Facilities Engineering and Operations New York Presbyterian Hospital


Tuesday April 8, 2014 8:15am - 9:15am PDT
Gold Room

9:25am PDT

Healthcare Facilities Research Response #1: Visual

The session will focus on the socio-cultural aspects of light that must be accounted for with respect to quality of light, both visual and non-visual, to satisfy the needs of patients and caregivers. 

Complexities of healthcare facilities include the challenge of designing for a variety of space types (newborn to geriatric; patient rooms to operating theaters; visitors’ lounges to nursing stations), casual to critical seeing tasks, satisfying concerns for safety and successful patient outcomes, all with “patient first” as the mandate. 

Traditionally, the effects of light, its sensory qualities, have not been acknowledged as much as the familiar measurable quantities such as illuminance, luminance, and watts per square foot.  How do we identify and define quality lighting for the specific benefit of patient wellbeing?  Does lighting play a role in improving patient response?  Do patients enjoy a beneficial response to daylighting?

Collaboration between design professionals and behavioral scientists is critical to our understanding of how to use light to gain potential health benefits in patient care facilities.


Speakers
avatar for Thomas D. Albright

Thomas D. Albright

The Salk Institute for Biological Studies
Thomas D. Albright, Ph. D., Conrad T. Prebys Professor and Director Systems, Neurobiology Laboratories, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies


Tuesday April 8, 2014 9:25am - 10:10am PDT
Gold Room

10:20am PDT

Healthcare Facilities Research Response #2: Non-Visual

The session will focus on the socio-cultural aspects of light that must be accounted for with respect to quality of light, both visual and non-visual, to satisfy the needs of patients and caregivers. 

Complexities of healthcare facilities include the challenge of designing for a variety of space types (newborn to geriatric; patient rooms to operating theaters; visitors’ lounges to nursing stations), casual to critical seeing tasks, satisfying concerns for safety and successful patient outcomes, all with “patient first” as the mandate. 

Traditionally, the effects of light, its sensory qualities, have not been acknowledged as much as the familiar measurable quantities such as illuminance, luminance, and watts per square foot.  How do we identify and define quality lighting for the specific benefit of patient wellbeing?  Does lighting play a role in improving patient response?  Do patients enjoy a beneficial response to daylighting?

Collaboration between design professionals and behavioral scientists is critical to our understanding of how to use light to gain potential health benefits in patient care facilities.


Speakers
avatar for Lone Mandrup Stidsen

Lone Mandrup Stidsen

Aalborg University
Lone Mandrup Stidsen, Ph.D., Department of Civil Engineering Aalborg University


Tuesday April 8, 2014 10:20am - 11:05am PDT
Gold Room
 
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